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Dr Neo Shermyn

Dr Neo Shermyn

​MBBS, MMed (Internal Medicine), MRCP (London)

Consultant

National Neuroscience Institute

Specialty: Neurology

Sub-specialties: General Neurology, Movement Disorders, Parkinson's Disease

Conditions Treated by this Doctor:
General Neurology, Parkinson Disease and Movement Disorders.

Clinical Appointments

  • Consultant Department of Neurology National Neuroscience InstituteNational Neuroscience Institute
  • Consultant NNI @CGH Changi General HospitalChangi General Hospital

Profile

Dr Shermyn Neo is a Consultant in the Department of Neurology at the National Neuroscience Institute.

She received her medical education from the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore. She completed her specialist training at the National Neuroscience Institute (Tan Tock Seng Campus).

She has special interest in movement disorders and Parkinson disease.

Education

MMED Int Med (Singapore), 2013

MRCP (London), 2013

MBBS National University of Singapore, 2011

Professional Appointments and Committee Memberships

  • Consultant, Department of Neurology, National Neuroscience Institute, 2019 – Present
  • Clinical Teacher, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine
  • Clinical Lecturer, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine
  • Physician Faculty for SingHealth Residency, Neurology

Awards

Research Interests

Publications

  • Collet-Sicard syndrome: a rare but important presentation of internal jugular vein thrombosis. S Neo, KE Lee. Practical Neurology 2017;17:63-65.
  • Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in China, Singapore and Japan: a comparison with the USA. Koelman DL, Benkeser DC, Xu Y, Neo SX, Tan K, Katsuno M, Sobue G, Natsume J, Chahin S, Mar SS, Venkatesan A, Chitnis T, Hoganson GM, Yeshokumar AK, Barreras P, Majmudar B, Carone M, Mateen FJ European Journal of Neurology 2017;2:391-396.

Research Trials

  • Thrombolysis and Endovascular Therapy Research in Acute Ischaemic Stroke in Singapore (TETRISS) – A Prospective Observational Cohort Study